Textbook: Electronic Literature Collection, Vol. 1
Editor(s): Hayles, Montfort, Rettberg, and Strickland
Reviewer: Angela Eward-Mangione, Instructor of English, Hillsborough Community College

Reviewer’s Summary This textbook is recommended for use in lower- and upper-level literature courses, genre-specific literature courses, and advanced composition courses offered by two- and four-year colleges. The volume consists of 60 works of electronic literature. These works have been written by various authors, and they present a variety of literary genres, as well as multiple modalities of electronic writing. The editors provide definitions of key terms and links to relevant examples. The textbook is organized well, and it is easy to navigate. In an advanced composition course, one could pair this textbook with readings that address the writing process, as well as those on new media. In a literature course, one could use this textbook as a primary text, complementing it with readings on literature and literary theory.

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Textbook: Electronic Literature Collection, Vol. 2
Editor(s): Borras, Memmott, Raley, and Stefans
Reviewer: Angela Eward-Mangione, Instructor of English, Hillsborough Community College

Reviewer’s Summary This textbook is recommended for use in literature courses, particularly those pertaining to contemporary literature, in two- and four-year colleges. The volume consists of 61 works of electronic literature. The textbook is organized well, and it is easy to navigate. The searchable Content by Keywords page is the most critical component of the textbook. The page defines terms that are relevant to electronic literature and provides links to texts that exemplify the terms. Countries represented by authors include Austria, Canada, Colombia, France, Germany, Mexico, Portugal, Spain, the Netherlands, and the United States. Most, but not all, of the texts are English-language texts. Other texts appear in French, German, Catalan, Spanish, and Portuguese, and some of these texts have been translated into English. Collectively, the texts deal with several contemporary themes, including dystopia, identity, technology, and privacy. In a literature course, one could use this textbook as a primary text, complementing it with readings on electronic literature and literary theory.

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Textbook: Literature, the Humanities, and Humanity
Author(s): Steinberg
Reviewer: Douglas King, Associate Professor of English, Gannon University
Reviewer’s Summary Literature, the Humanities, and Humanity is a work of love. The author communicates his love and appreciate for great literature, which is contagious. Individual chapters focus on classic, well-known selections. At the end of each chapter, the author recommends other works by the relevant author and/or from the period. The style throughout is conversational and warmly appealing, and Dr. Steinberg’s insights into the works are often helpful. Overall this volume would be most useful for a faculty member to digest, enjoy, and share with one’s students in small excerpts.
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Textbook: Outline of American Literature
Author(s): VanSpanckeren
Reviewer: Susan Amper, Assoc. Professor of English, Bronx Community College
Reviewer’s Summary I would recommend this book. I would adopt the chapters on early America and the 19th century for a survey class for freshmen or sophomores. The chapters dealing with the 20th century and beyond could be useful in a class on poetry. The text is not modular, so if possible, modular capability should be added.
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Textbook: Studies in Classic American Literature
Author(s): Lawrence
Reviewer: Alena Hairston MFA, English Professor, Solano Community College
Review Date: March, 2012
Reviewer’s Summary This textbook is recommended for high school through four year college students, and is appropriate for first year composition and upper division writing and rhetoric courses. The principal strength of this book is that it is a public domain edition of the D. H. Lawrence text, so is completely free for use and adaptation. It provides a particularly strong exploration of the American white male identity and its continual conflict with the reality of human equality and the myth of a racial and gendered superiority. The book would benefit from greater modularity and footnotes and/or links to additional resources to help contextualize the time period and style of writing.